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Details of Scorpene Submarines Leaked

NEW DELHI, Aug 24: Highly classified information on what makes six submarines being built in Mumbai so crucial for India's security have been leaked - more than 22,000 pages that serve as the operating manual of the Scorpene submarine have been made available with excerpts released online by an Australian newspaper.

The Scorpenes, being built for 3.5 billion dollars at the Mazgaon docks at Mumbai, are considered some of the most advanced of their class in the world. They are so silent underwater that they are extremely difficult, if not impossible to detect. But now their sonar capabilities, the noise they generate and details of the combat system they are armed with are totally exposed.

"The Navy Chief (Admiral Sunil Lanba) has been asked to analyse what exactly has been leaked," said Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar, describing the data release as "a hacking." Navy sources said they are confident that the leak took place "outside India" and stressed that "the damage does not seem to be substantial" even as analysts in Australia suggested that's not correct. The Australian newspaper reported that the leak occurred in France in 2011. At the moment, it's unclear where the leak of data came from France or India, where the six Indian submarines are being built at the Mazgaon docks as part of a deal with DCNS, the French shipbuilder.

Submarines are considered the ultimate stealth weapon. Knowing how much sound a submarine makes underwater gives enemies the ability to know just where to look to detect the submarine. The sort of information that has been placed publicly is the stuff of a navy's nightmare. The Scorpene fiasco is being seen as the compromising of security of one of the world's biggest defence projects.

The DCNS Group has also been signed up by Australia for a 38-billion dollar deal, but the documents that have been released cover the Scorpene-class model and do not contain any details of the vessel currently being designed for the Australian fleet.

Excerpts published in redacted form on the Australian newspaper's website contained highly sensitive details of the submarine including technical manuals and models of the boat's antennae.

The first of the Scorpene class submarines being built in India, the INS Kalvari, took part in sea trials in May and is expected to be inducted soon in the navy.

 

India Test-Fires Surface-To-Air Missile Developed Jointly With Israel

BALASORE, June 30: India today successfully test-fired a new surface-to-air missile, developed jointly with Israel, from a defence base off Odisha coast.

The medium range missile (MR-SAM), a product of joint venture between India and Israel, was successfully test launched from a mobile launcher in the Integrated Test Range (ITR) at Chandipur at around 8.15 am, a DRDO official said.

"The test launch was a grand success and it met all the targets," he said.

The missile positioned at launch pad-3 of the ITR swung in to action after getting signal from the radars to intercept a moving aerial target supported by an unmanned air vehicle (UAV) 'Banshee' over the Bay of Bengal, officials said.

Apart from the missile, the system includes a Multi Functional Surveillance and Threat Alert Radar (MF STAR) for detection, tracking and guidance of the missile, they said.

"The missile along with MF-STAR will provide the users with the capability to neutralise any aerial threats," said a Defence Research & Development Organisation (DRDO) scientist.

Indian Defence Research Development Laboratory (DRDL), a laboratory of DRDO based at Hyderabad, has jointly developed this missile in collaboration with Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), he said.

A new production facility to deliver 100 missiles a year has been established for such type of long rang and medium range surface-to-air missiles at M/s Bharat Dynamics Limited, India.

The missile, which was initially proposed to be tested yesterday, was deferred in the last moment for today. Earlier, Indian Navy had successfully test launched the long range surface-to-air missile (LR-SAM). The test was undertaken on the Western Seaboard by INS Kolkata on December 30, 2015, officials said.

Such type of medium range surface-to-air missiles (SR-SAM), having striking ranges from 50 to 70 km, can fill the gap of existing missiles that India has in its armory at present, they said.

These missiles would be inducted in all three services after user's trial is completed.

As a safety measure, Balasore district administration in consultation with the defence officials had temporarily shifted 3652 civilians residing within 2.5 km radius of the launch pad No.3 of the ITR at Chandipur to nearby shelter centres this morning to ensure a safe launch of the missile, said a district revenue official.

Fishermen engaged in sea fishing along the Bay of Bengal in three Odisha coastal districts namely Balasore, Bhadrakh and Kendrapada were asked not to venture into the sea during the test launch time.

Chinese army spotted along LoC in Pak-occupied Kashmir: sources

SRINAGAR, March 13: After frequent incursions in Ladakh area, Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) troops have been spotted at forward posts along the Line of Control (LoC) on the Pakistani side of Kashmir, ringing alarm bells in the security grid.

The army spotted presence of senior PLA officials at the forward posts opposite Nowgam sector in North Kashmir after which some intercepts of Pakistani army officers suggested that the Chinese troops have come to create some infrastructure along the LoC, sources said on Sunday.

Though the army has officially maintained complete silence on the issue, they have been constantly updating various intelligence agencies about the presence of PLA troops along the Line of Control, sources said.

The PLA troops were first spotted in the later part of 2015 and ever since their presence was witnessed opposite Tangdhar sector as well. In this area, Chinese government-owned China Gezhouba Group Company Limited has been building a Jhelum-Neelum 970 MW Hydel power project.

The hydel project is being built in response to India's Kishanganga power project being built in Bandipore of North Kashmir. The Indian project is designed to divert water from the Kishanganga River to a power plant in the Jhelum River basin and will have an installed capacity of 330 MW. Construction on the project began in 2007 and is expected to be complete this year.

The intercepts also suggested that Chinese PLA would be digging some tunnels in Leepa Valley, located in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (PoK), to build an all-weather road which will serve as an alternate route to reach Karakoram Highway.

The visit by PLA officials is seen by experts as part of Beijing's 46 billion dollar China-Pakistan-Economic Corridor (CPEC) under which Gwadar port in Karachi is linked to Chinese Xinjiang province through Karakoram highway, an area under illegal occupation of China.

As the CPEC project was given final shape, India had last year registered its protest against the presence of Chinese troops in Gilgit and Baltistan, an area in PoK, saying that it was unacceptable to India.

In the meantime, some of the experts in the nation's security grid have been giving serious thoughts to the presence of PLA in close proximity with Pakistani army officials. Chinese officials have maintained that CPEC was an economical package to link Asia with Eurasia.

 



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